Michael Hemesath

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Michael Hemesath

About Michael Hemesath

Michael Hemesath is the 13th president of Saint John's University. A 1981 SJU graduate, Hemesath is the first layperson appointed to a full presidential term at SJU. You can find him on Twitter [at] PrezHemesath.

Thanksgiving at Saint John’s

students celebrate ThanksgivingThanksgiving has become a contested holiday. Some historians argue that the Thanksgiving narrative encourages “stereotypical and racist portrayals of Native peoples” that are “ahistorical.”  Critics urge that Thanksgiving be decolonized and de-romanticized, especially in elementary schools.

students celebrate Thanksgiving Certainly the academy should welcome challenges to the prevailing wisdom in all disciplines.  Academic freedom, the bedrock of the university, encourages, and even requires, that students and faculty challenge themselves to examine different perspectives and test their ideas and beliefs against alternative views, regardless of how uncomfortable such an exercise can be.

And yet…there is also a time to step back, to lighten up.

Monks help at Thanksgiving dinner

To take turkeys and cranberries and Indians out of Thanksgiving and to make the Pilgrims racist colonizers is to take the pleasure out of the holiday for children, and, most importantly, it is to miss the most important message of the holiday: Give Thanks.  Historians can reengage in the debate about the historical details and interpretation the Monday after.

At Saint John’s last week we took time to remember that central message.  In a tradition dating back 37 years, Saint John’s Dining Service and Events staff undertook the formidable task of feeding 1635 Johnnies, Bennies and SOT graduate students (up over 100 from a year ago), approximately half the total student population at CSB/SJU, in three sittings, which of course necessitated turning around the dining areas twice.

The menu included:

248 turkeys or 3224  pounds–boned, rolled and tied turkey used in an effort to prevent waste and to help prevent novice student carvers from cutting themselves (!)
50 gallons of turkey gravy
625 pounds of potatoes
262 pounds of corn
210 pumpkin pies

Students celebrate ThanksgivingMost importantly and generously, the Dining Service had over 100 faculty, staff and monastic volunteers who helped serve the students.  These individuals took an evening away from their families and communities to tell our student how much they appreciate and care about them.

The event started as a Saint John’s event, but its popularity led to inviting Saint Ben’s students to join the festivities.  In an interesting nod to gender difference, at least among 18-22 year-olds, Johnnies are given a three hour head start when tickets are made available to ensure that all young men that want to attend are able, even if they are not quite as organized and forward looking as their Bennie friends! 😊  The Men’s Chorus stopped by to serenade the diners.  Naturally groups of friends attend together, as do sports teams and other students who have common interests.  I chatted with several international students who, despite not having grown up with this holiday, said they, “Loved this dinner” and have attended every year.  I even observed some couples that looked like they were on a date.

Students celebrate Thanksgiving

The atmosphere of joy, community and thanksgiving was palpable.

Thanksgiving blessings to the members of the CSB and SJU community.  Thank you all for making this community the special place it is.

By |November 21st, 2018|Categories: History, Kudos|0 Comments

Scenes from a D3 Football Game, SJU vs. Thomas More University

Image gojohnnies.com

The game starts gray and cold. The temperature is in the low 20s, and there is a noticeable breeze. Light snow is falling, but the weather forecast says it shouldn’t last. Alas, the weather forecast is wrong, and the snow picks up. By late in the second quarter, the field is white.  A guy with a shovel on the sideline keeps running out every few plays to clear a two foot wide path so the players can see the goal line.  The teams play on, oblivious, even seeming to enjoy sliding tackles and diving for passes, cushioned by a few inches of powder.

Half-time arrives. Every November, during the football game closest to Veterans Day, we honor the services of men and women in the Armed Forces. We invite an active duty alumnus back to be honored and to represent all the alumni and fans who have served.  This year, the brigadier general waits quietly on the sideline as time winds down.  Once the second quarter ends, many of the Johnnies, rather than heading right for the locker room on a chilly day, take a detour to shake this alum’s hand and thank him for his service.  He is surprised and touched by this gesture.  Later that afternoon, he leaves his alma mater feeling uplifted and hopeful for the future.

Image Jennifer McNelly

The field is now covered in snow, and the athletic director and assistant director have a problem. They have to figure out how to clear the field during halftime.  Shovels are rounded up and handed out to a small crew of student workers.  And then, a bit like the parable of the loaves and fishes, other students, attending as fans, come out of the stands and ask for shovels too.  The group – including many practiced Minnesotans – sets to work, and the field is clear by the time the players return. The athletic staff are tickled pink.  Burgers and brats are rounded up to feed the crew, and the hungry students think they’ve been fed at a Michelin two-star restaurant.

The final gun sounds, and the two teams make their way across the field toward each other. Suddenly two or three Johnnies are on the ground, on their backs. Those in the press box look at each other perplexed.  Then they smile. The players are making snow angels on the field.

Image @ccarrIX via Twitter

The stadium is largely empty as two visiting fans make their way through the home team’s bleachers.  The visiting team came over 1500 miles on a bus, and these visiting parents drove almost that same distance.  Had the game turned out differently, the visitors might have had a chance at making the playoffs, but these parents are not disappointed. They had gotten to see their son play his last college football game in a beautiful setting.  As they moved toward the exit, they said that their son had always wanted to play a game in the snow, but since his college is in Kentucky, that had never happened, until today.  They think it was a sweetly fitting note on which to end his college career. The offensive lineman’s father says, “We will be cheering for the Johnnies in the playoffs. It would be great for our son to be able to say that his last game was played in the snow against the eventual national champions.”

Image gojohnnies.com

One of the Johnnies is interviewed about the game.  After some questions about the playoffs, he is asked what it was like to play in these weather conditions.  He smiles delightedly and says, “It was like being a kid again and playing snow football in your backyard.”

How many D1 football players had as much fun in their games before tens of thousands in the stadium and hundreds of thousands of TV viewers? I’d venture to say not very many.

By |November 13th, 2018|Categories: Alumni, Kudos|0 Comments

Education and a Booming Economy

Arguably one of the most important purposes of post-secondary education is to improve one’s economic prospects.  Economists call this investing in human capital.  There is overwhelming economic research to support the proposition that investing in a college education increases economic returns over a lifetime.  The typical analysis compares the lifetime earnings of a high school graduate to those of a college graduate, and the results are unambiguous: investing in post-secondary education pays a higher rate of return than the stock market.  (See here and here).

downward trend lineBut what if economic circumstances change this calculation? The current US economy has among the lowest overall unemployment rate in nearly 50 years and the lowest rates ever recorded for black Americans and Hispanic Americans.  (See here, here, here, and here )

Recent news stories have reported that many employers, including tech giants Google and Apple, have dropped the requirement of a college degree for entry level employees. Other news stories have reported that recent high school graduates are making six-figure incomes in some industries, including the oil and gas industry.  It is arguable that there has never been a better time for a high school graduate to head to the job market.

Google logo

Should this exceptional economy change the way talented and ambitious high school students consider their college decision?  Their investment in human capital?

I think the answer is unambiguously no.  College remains the right choice for most high school graduates because a college education is not about preparing students for the first job after graduation, it is an investment for a career and a lifetime.

Young people entering the job market may well get jobs with a dream employer and might earn incomes their parents would envy, but when the economy slows down, as it inevitably will, how prepared will recent hires be to weather that economic bump, to say nothing about moving up the career ladder?

It is certainly understandable why employers are seeking fresh talent in this economy and are currently willing to forego a college degree, but Google and Apple are not making any commitments to new hires regarding the future.  They are not promising that long-run retention decisions will not consider educational attainment, and certainly promotion decisions will weigh whether a candidate has a college education, as that degree can signal some important information about an individual’s talents and character.

A young person can certainly go back to college or take courses part-time to get their degree if employment prospects decline in the future, but older students often find it harder to complete degrees if they are not moving through college with their peers or if they have additional responsibilities like a family to consider.

In short, the current booming economy has likely temporarily narrowed the gap between the earnings of recent high school grads and young college graduates, but there is no evidence to suggest that historical trends showing that the gap between high school graduate earnings and college grad earnings widening over a lifetime have changed.

A college education is still a wise investment for most high school students despite an attractive job market because the investment is about a lifetime not the duration of the current economic boom.

A parent recently told me about his daughter’s decision to drop out of college after a year because she felt the education was not needed.  She got an entry level job in a retail establishment.  She found she liked the work and was good at it.  She talked to her store manager about the company’s management trainee program and was encouraged to apply but was also told that a college degree was required to be accepted into the program.  The young woman is back in college with renewed motivation, is doing exceptionally well and her parents are delighted.